stuff. sometimes...

I'm Mike. I like movies a lot. So, I'll try to write about them, sometimes. The rest of the time I'll probably just reblog movie stuff you've seen a million times.

The Conversation — dir. Francis Ford Coppola

(Source: strangewood)

his delivery of that line in the fourth box is close to my favorite part of this film…

(Source: michaelsocha, via krazy-8)

—JOHN STURGES’ COMMENTARY ON THE ‘BAD DAY AT BLACK ROCK’ LASERDISC

cinephilearchive:

Paul Thomas Anderson once said that he learned everything he knows about directing from John Sturges’ commentary on the ‘Bad Day at Black Rock’ LaserDisc. This was an exclusive of Cinephilia & Beyond, the commentary stayed on the Criterion LD for ages — until it was ripped a while ago. So the only way anyone could ever hear this is if they had a LaserDisc player. Well, not anymore. “This was the first MGM film to be shot in Cinemascope. According to director John Sturges’s commentary track on the Criterion Laserdisc release, it was also filmed at the same time in the standard 4:3 ratio version because studio executives still weren’t sure how well the wide screen format would work. That version was never released.” —Behind the Camera On ‘Bad Day at Black Rock’

Film is about reaction

“Film is reactive. What counts is what your players react to. So, if you go past your principal actors at what’s happening, then you cut around, reverse back onto that actor — automatically you’re in a close shot, which is what you wanna be, and automatically you’re cutting off what happened to see how it affected him. That’s the name of the game in films. Hitchcock said it all. He said, ‘Cutting means the ability to make an audience feel what you want them to feel by the reaction of somebody to something.’”

image

“Here, Sturges talks about how Dore Schary of MGM and screenwriter Millard Kaufman, who wrote the script to ‘Bad Day at Black Rock,’ came up with two elements for the story and how they work together to form a living narrative: ‘One: He was a man whose life was saved by a Japanese boy in Italy. The boy died and he was given a metal for his heroism. He’s looking for the father of that boy to give him the metal in an expression of thanks. Two: He’s lost the use of his arm. He feels mutilated, unneeded, defeated, and leading a pointless existence. Put those two elements in this and you have a story. And it moves. It’s alive, and you identify. It goes somewhere.’” —V Renée, No Film School

“Millard Kaufman, who passed away on March 14, 2009, at the age of 92, accomplished something maybe even more significant than his two Academy Awards nominations. And that is the fact that he managed to sustain a writing career for seven decades. Documentary filmmaker Edmond Stevens presents a segement of his feature length documentary, ‘Spec,’ about the culture and commerce of spec screenplay writing. Millard was generous enough to to contribute an interview for this movie and here are a few excerpts and his take on ‘a life well-written.’ A special thank you goes out to his wife of 66 years, Lorraine Kaufman.” —Millard Kaufman: A life at the Movies

Read, learn, & absorb: Millard Kaufman's screenplay for ‘Bad Day at Black Rock.’ (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

“The film itself is an hour and 21 minutes, when I got done splicing up the bits I marked as informative — I had about 50 minutes of material from Sturges. After the split, I left out about 20 minutes that was good, but mostly outdated. So what you’ve got is essentially 30 minutes of some really great fucking filmmaking discussion. I am thankful that this great man left us with some insight before he left this earth.” —filmschoolthrucommentaries

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

cinephilearchive:

“Well, I don’t have to tell you that we weren’t trying to write a screenplay that was perfectly-structured. We were just trying to make it make sense. I remember, even without Roman, the first structural question, which may seem absurd now after the fact, was the question of which revelation comes first, the incest or the water scandal? And of course, it was the water scandal. When I realized that, I realized how foolish it was even to have asked the question. But the water scandal was the plot, essentially, and the subplot was the incest. That was the underbelly, and the two were intimately connected, literally and metaphorically: raping the future and raping the land. So it was a really good plot/subplot with a really strong connection. In the first draft, as I recall, it was pretty much a single point-of-view. And in the second draft I tried changing that for purposes of clarification and I think in the end, that’s what made the second draft weaker than the first draft. It’s one of the very, very few detective movies, including ‘The Maltese Falcon,’ which has a singular point-of-view.” —Robert Towne looks back on Chinatown’s 35th anniversary

“In fact, before you set out to write your beat sheet, consider this: one of the most ‘perfect’ screenplays ever written is ‘Chinatown.’ It has been analyzed thousands and thousands of times in screenwriting classes and textbooks. However, the first draft of ‘Chinatown’ was 178 pages long; screenwriter Robert Towne took 9 months to finish it saying that ‘… the writing of it was just tough: writing scenario, after scenario, after scenario was just so complicated that after a certain point, I thought I’d never get through it.’ Producer Robert Evans called the first draft brilliant but incomprehensible, and even Towne himself admitted that if the first draft had been shot, ‘it would have been a mess.’ That ‘perfect beat sheet’ that appears in screenplay books only emerged after a long process of restructuring, revision and clarification. (See LA Times Article on the director/writer/producer collaboration in ‘Chinatown.’)” —Sean Hood, Writing The Feature Script: Week Three — The Treatment
Download the ‘Chinatown’ Step Sheet. (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

//

cinephilearchive:

“Well, I don’t have to tell you that we weren’t trying to write a screenplay that was perfectly-structured. We were just trying to make it make sense. I remember, even without Roman, the first structural question, which may seem absurd now after the fact, was the question of which revelation comes first, the incest or the water scandal? And of course, it was the water scandal. When I realized that, I realized how foolish it was even to have asked the question. But the water scandal was the plot, essentially, and the subplot was the incest. That was the underbelly, and the two were intimately connected, literally and metaphorically: raping the future and raping the land. So it was a really good plot/subplot with a really strong connection. In the first draft, as I recall, it was pretty much a single point-of-view. And in the second draft I tried changing that for purposes of clarification and I think in the end, that’s what made the second draft weaker than the first draft. It’s one of the very, very few detective movies, including ‘The Maltese Falcon,’ which has a singular point-of-view.” —Robert Towne looks back on Chinatown’s 35th anniversary

“In fact, before you set out to write your beat sheet, consider this: one of the most ‘perfect’ screenplays ever written is ‘Chinatown.’ It has been analyzed thousands and thousands of times in screenwriting classes and textbooks. However, the first draft of ‘Chinatown’ was 178 pages long; screenwriter Robert Towne took 9 months to finish it saying that ‘… the writing of it was just tough: writing scenario, after scenario, after scenario was just so complicated that after a certain point, I thought I’d never get through it.’ Producer Robert Evans called the first draft brilliant but incomprehensible, and even Towne himself admitted that if the first draft had been shot, ‘it would have been a mess.’ That ‘perfect beat sheet’ that appears in screenplay books only emerged after a long process of restructuring, revision and clarification. (See LA Times Article on the director/writer/producer collaboration in ‘Chinatown.’)” —Sean Hood, Writing The Feature Script: Week Three — The Treatment

Download the ‘Chinatown’ Step Sheet. (NOTE: For educational purposes only)

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

davidlowebianco:

My senior thesis film. If you like it please share it with others. Now on to the next project!

(via dlowebianco)